The Flipped Classroom

There is much discussion lately about the flipped classroom.  Since I adore the combination of technology and learning, and since I teach several college classes as hybrid models (half-online and half in-person), I give the flipped classroom a thumbs up for tech-savvy educators and plugged-in students.  However, I do believe you need both to make the flip work properly.

This infographic explains the flipped classroom well.  If you caught this week's Tech Tuesday with the Khan Academy, you have ready-made, awesome instruction right there.  You'd be flipped-ready with Khan in your back pocket.

Flipped Classroom
(Infographic Created by Knewton and Column Five Media)

Upcyclists, what do you think of the flipped classroom?  Could students complete mini-lessons at home and then come to class prepared to put their new learning into practice?

Your comments are welcome below.  But, you knew that.

Curious,

Jen

10 comments:

  1. Wow! I think that this sounds like a great idea....it seems like we can't afford NOT to try this. In a traditional classroom (in AACo) do you know if it would be up to the individual teacher to implement this style of teaching or do you think it would have to be approved by the administration?

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  2. I absolutely love this idea! Working out homework at home can be really frustrating sometimes, and sometimes even if you understand it, sometimes you just can't focus on your own or you can't find the time, and this kind of eliminates the problem. Plus, I think a lot of times students are afraid to ask the teacher questions if they're having trouble understanding but are probably more comfortable asking a peer for help if working on things in class. Actually, that happens a lot in traditional classrooms, where a teacher will say something and a student will ask a classmate for clarification but then the teacher gets upset for 'talking and interrupting' the class. But the flipped classroom would encourage that kind of activity :)

    -Brittany B.

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  3. Kim - I think this would depend on the teacher, how connected the students can be at home AND the philosophy of the school or admin team.

    Brittany - I think you are right. This would provide ample opportunity for question/answer sessions, "homework" (though we may need to rename that, right? Since it won't be completed at home anymore) and maybe less disruptions as students will see how theory/lesson meet practice/real life.

    Jen

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  4. I have been flipping my classroom this year and both the students and I are enjoying it and having more fun! The knowledge seems to 'stick' and we get into great discussions and have time for more hands-on exploratory learning!

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    1. Ms. Cheston - I would love to hear more. What do your students think about it? Their parents?

      It sounds like it is working well, but I'd love more perspectives.

      Jen

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  5. My school is currently doind this in math and I can tell you some parents are outraged, many have been to Admin with complaints......but in private school it is what it is......

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    1. Anonymous - Anytime there is change in our schools, it doesn't sit well with many - like parents. I would love to hear what students think about the flipped classroom and ask teachers what difference it has made.

      Jen

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